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starlitegirl

Pheros absorbed through skin?

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I've been wondering if pheros can be absorbed through the skin or if they post any kind of risk to our hormones? I haven't been able to find anything online about it, and I figure they're probably safe. I know some of the women here have been using them for ages. I'm just a wee bit concerned because of health issue that's come up that appears to have some correlation to hormones though the correlation it not 100% clear, the group that are most effected by it tend to be women 30+ (but generally older) where their hormones are declining.

 

I've been avoiding them to be on the safe side for now, and also because when I'm not feeling well I don't really feel like shooting for sexy. Shooting for sleep is more my thing.

 

Anyway, I'm just curious though I'm figuring there is most likely no reason to be concerned.

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Wow, you're actually one of the few people to share my concern about this. Given, this was one of the first things I was concerned about before I knew anything about pheros, and 2 different scientists have assured me that absorption is negligible, but the potential of such was one of the reasons why I chose to put our unscented phero blends into the base of CPS, (aka D5 or cyclopentasiloxane). No other company offers pheros in this base - it's too pricey.

 

CPS is a liquid silicone that is skin safe as it is molecularly too large to be absorbed into the skin. It creates a safety layer and makes whatever is added to it sit on top of the skin. Besides the advantage of not absorbing into the skin, it also creates a barrier so that fragrances are less likely to be corrupted by one's skin chemistry, and can lengthen the wear of both pheros and perfumes.

 

CPS is only in our UNscented phero blends, but it is available (at our cost) in our store separately to be used as a layer under your scents and pheros. The downside of CPS is that it does not permanently mix with the pheros in the bottle. It layers the product like salad dressing, so you have to remember to shake the bottle each time before you use it - but there's a reminder sticker to that effect on the bottles.

 

So, what info did you find about this issue, starlite? I haven't been able to find anything myself, it just seemed a logical concern since some of the ingredients in phero blends seemingly fall into the class of hormones or steroids.

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I think I might want to buy some CPS for the few blends that I that don't have CPS, even though most of the pheros I have from here are unscented, which seemed the logical choice rather than having to wear the same scent every time I wanted to wear a phero.

 

I do feel much better about wearing the pheros now, and I'm so grateful you responded.

 

I did find something in a search through google:

 

 

discussing pheromone overdoes due to build up

 

another site with a post addressing buildup

 

 

While neither of these get into what could happen to the body due to pheromone buildup, I personally think there could be a link between pheromone and hormones that could possibly throw our hormones out of whack. I hadn't been concerned originally that pheromones could do that until I came across articles about copulins that discussed them being connected to women who spend large amounts of time together (coworkers, family, close friends) having their bodies synchronize menstrual cycles. And that's not even from application directly to the skin. I personally experienced this phenomena multiple times in my life at work when I was working with a lot of women in healthcare and then with a close friend when we were spending fair amounts of time together between college and socializing. So when my own health issue arose and the doctor told me what she thought it was, after finding a support group online and realizing that there is some correlation (though not 100% - probably more like70-80%) to occurrence in older women whose hormones are declining naturally, bells and whistles went off in my mind.

 

Two of the treatments are actually hormone based ointments/creams but only used very minimally. The other that's been used for most women with a large degree of success is a very strong cortisone cream though there's a new non-cortisone cream that's been used with success as well. So given all these things I've just become more wary of pheromones in general especially since in the case of copulins the common thinking is to use more if you're older because your body is producing less of them. That coupled with the menstrual cycle synchronization phenomenon (and my own experience of a shift in my cycle when I began wearing copulins) has just got me thinking about my health and the timing of this condition's development. I think I had it to some degree before I was wearing pheromones, but I'm wondering if wearing them somewhat regularly was a trigger that exacerbated it.

 

I'll still wear them, but less frequently than I was just to be on the safe side especially since there has been some recent discussion of abnormal hormone levels being linked to cancer. While I don't think everyone who uses pheromones would experience this, I do think in my particular case I'm going to choose to err on the side of caution. But knowing that the base you've chosen acts as a barrier to pheromone absorbtion puts my mind at ease.

 

Thanks for taking the time to respond. I feel much better about using my unscented pheros even though I'm going to use them less just to be extra cautious given my own circumstances.

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Star G

 

Whatever your situation I wish you blessings and extra health.

 

This sight is so informative and i learn so much about a varied of topics, glad i found it

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Starlite, there's a difference between pheromones and things that simply have a pheromonal effect. EoW (synthetic copulins) is not a pheromone at all, it has no pheromones in it, and is completely safe for prolonged use. This copulin product is actually an assortment of vinegars that duplicate the smell of natural copulins (greatly amplified) and have a pheromonal effect on men and women, but it's really triggered more by sense memory and instinct rather than by a medicinal factor.

 

There's a school of thought that says that what causes women's periods to shift is DHEA (for short), which declines in the body with age. This is not a pheromone, it's a hormone, and it's being used by some companies as a pheromone additive using the logic that it may have something to do with women bonding together. However, there are greater levels of it in men, so I'm not quite sure that logic works. DHEA is also credited with keeping the labido high, and giving off a youthful vibe, and is sold over the counter as a dietary supplement...sold in pill form as a fountain of youth wonder drug...which is pretty alarming to many serious doctors because it's long term health effects are unknown.

 

The articles above about build up strike me more as sales pitches, rather than anything factual.

 

If you see no good reactions after you use pheromones or you see better reactions when you don't apply pheromones - you have this problem.

 

and

 

Signs of pheromone build-up are:

* You initially had good reactions but after a period of use you noticed a significant drop off in effectiveness.

 

Hmmmm. That's pretty convenient.

:wink2:

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Very good points regarding the articles.

 

I was more concerned that pheromones could trigger hormonal responses, which you've addressed so this eliminates a concern as well as something that might have been a possible trigger.

 

I think I was concerned that I did something to bring this on myself. Part of my processing of it and making sense of it, I suppose.

 

All I can say is thank you a thousand times over for taking the time to respond with helpful information that makes far more sense to me than anything I could find on my own. I appreciate you taking the time to clarify all of this for me.

 

Regarding DHEA, I've seen it pimped everywhere from weight lifting sites to vitamin sites. I think there are some good supplements out there that have been proven through research to do our bodies good (fish oil/omega 3 - vitamin D, vitamin supplements) but then there are these other things that you've never heard of until recently and there's next to no empirical data on them or medical foundation in what they're saying they can do, and people assume they're safe. Now the FDA is going to step in and standardize them because of all of this and questions about if these supplements even meet basic standards of safety and purity. I guess that's sort of what my thinking was regarding pheromones, and now that I'm more informed I feel much better about using them and knowing they are safe to use especially with the CPS.

 

It really does feel better when you are well informed. Thanks again, Mara!

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This doesn't address wearing them on the skin, but exposure to (i.e., inhaling) pheromones is known to influence hormone production. See the second study J. V. Kohl cites (T = testosterone, LH = luteinizing hormone, E2 = estradiol, which is a form of estrogen).

 

http://www.pheromonetalk.com/womens-pherom....html#post87380

 

 

Shinohara K, Morofushi M, Funabashi T, Mitsushima D, Kimura F.

Effects of 5alpha-androst-16-en-3alpha-ol on the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone in human females.Chem Senses. 2000 Aug;25(4):465-7.

 

"The LH and T response to olfactory/pheromonal input has been repeatedly indicated or reported in findings from non-human animal studies and from human studies. In mammals, short-term exposure of males to females is linked to a T increase in men, as well as in rats, mice, rabbits, bulls, rams, and monkeys. The T increase in non-human mammals is believed to be due to the effect of pheromonal conditioning of an LH response that precedes the T increase (Graham & Desjardins, 1980). (An ovulatory phase, LH-facilitated, E2 and T response to pheromones is indicated but less well-detailed due to its cyclic nature in females.)" (Kohl, 2007, p. 325-326)

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Edited by Carrie

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