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I absolutely adore treasured hearts blend which contains 5-Anol, Can someone please help me understand, what is the difference between 5a-Androstenol and regular androstenol, I want to know what it is in TH that I love ;)

(also)

 

What exactly is phenylandrosten-3a-ol, which is in another phero spray I occasionally use and

adore???

 

Feeling frustrated because Ive scoured the internet and cant seem to find any scientific or descriptions otherwise :lol:

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If you are a member of the Androtics community they might have more information if you run a search on their board...until someone here has the time to elaborate.

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I thought 5a-Androstenol & Androstenol were different names for the same phero?

I thought they were both different names for describing "A-nol" (i.e. 5a-Androst-16-en-3a-ol)?

 

Are there different types of A-nol?

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I thought 5a-Androstenol & Androstenol were different names for the same phero?

I thought they were both different names for describing "A-nol" (i.e. 5a-Androst-16-en-3a-ol)?

 

Are there different types of A-nol?

 

Yes, Thats what I was thinking because I see different names for a-nol on my pheros... 3a, 5a maybe they have carry different properties.

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If you are a member of the Androtics community they might have more information if you run a search on their board...until someone here has the time to elaborate.

 

Ok, I'm going to go digg deeper...

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Yes, Thats what I was thinking because I see different names for a-nol on my pheros... 3a, 5a maybe they have carry different properties.

 

The 3 & 5 refer to "locations" of specific bonds on the molecule...eg an atom "x" that bonds with the 5th carbon atom of the structure would be called 5X-(rest of structure)

People with limited knowledge of chemistry might not know that or understand the importance of the location of bonds in a molecule so it's easy to understand how the same molecule/phero can be called slightly different names when marketed, when they are still actually just the same molecule

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